FAQ

If your child has been diagnosed with a brain tumor, he or she may be eligible to donate to the CBTTC. Please ask your child’s doctor for more information.

Who donates tissue to the CBTTC?

People from all backgrounds and communities donate to the CBTTC.

How do I donate tissue?

If your child has been diagnosed with a brain tumor he or she may be eligible to donate to the CBTTC. Please ask your child’s doctor for more information. Your child’s physician will talk to you about the CBTTC, your consent to donate samples, and answer any questions you may have.

We extend our heartfelt gratitude to the many generous and committed donor constituents who have supported the CBTTC initiative. Together we are making pioneering progress in pediatric brain tumor research.

What are samples?

The samples (biospecimens) the CBTTC collects are all types of childhood brain tumor tissue samples and, if available, blood or saliva from the patient and their parents. The tissue submitted to the CBTTC is only what is left over after the tissue collected from a biopsy or resection is used for the child’s care. Many families give permission for unused portions of tissue to be submitted to the CBTTC in the hope that new knowledge might help other patients in the future.

How are samples used?

Scientists use the tissue samples to study how the tumor works by looking at its genes and proteins. These specimens play a critical role in our emerging understanding of how these tumors work. For example, studying samples from breast cancer patients helped researchers create a test to identify breast cancer types, create new treatments, and customize treatments.

How will my privacy be protected?

Your privacy is our highest priority. Any biospecimens donated to the CBTTC will not have any information that can be linked to you or your family.

What will happen to the samples and information collected?

The samples and information will be stored at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). All information that identifies the donor will be removed. The de-identified samples and information are then used by researchers across the world.

What if we need the extra tissue for future clinical use?

Can we see the results of the research in the future?

How do we know if there are genetic links found? Can you let us know if there are?

Does this research find out if there is cancer?